Much Ado About Nothing

by William Shakespeare

He backs him up without poise

Chicago Reader

Christopher Prentice as Beatrice gives the best performance of the production.

> “Much Ado Shaltz”

Justin Shaltz
J. Kelly Nestruck

Christopher Prentice captures the madness and the desperate hope of the wait for Godot in each, cleanly articulated movement and line.

> “Godot Sullivan WCT”

Catey Sullivan

Christopher Prentice’s Marlow is worth the price of admission

> “worth the price of admission”

Kris Vire
Time Out Chicago

deft command of classical rhetoric destined for recognition beyond the storefront circuit

> “Hamlet Velvet Willies Barnidge WCT”

Mary Shen Barnidge

a bright spot, along with Christopher Prentice’s wily Mercutio

> “SSRJ Metz Tribune”

Nina Metz
Chicago Tribune

Christopher Prentice and Shannon E. Farmer bring strong presence to Booth and Guiteau.

> “Assassins, Abarbanel, Windy City Times”

Jonathan Abarbanel

As the show’s primary devil, Christopher Prentice makes a charming John Wilkes Booth.

> “Assassins, Chicago Free Press”

Web Behrens
Chicago Free Press

brilliant and seemingly fearless

> “Elizabeth Rex Milwaukee JS Fischer”

Mike Fischer

Credit rests with Christopher Prentice whose agile, uncontrived performance as the gallant outlaw reflects a striking command of Shakespeare’s language

> “Robin Hood Daily Herald”

Barbara Vitello
Daily Herald

impressive … engrossing, cliché-free performance

> “Zoo Story Vitello Daily Herald”

Barbara Vitello
Daily Herald

Prentice] is an actor of immense versatility and presence.

> “OnMilwaukee Elizabeth Rex”

Dave Begel

a must-see production if you crave conversation material for erudite social circles

> “Godot West Centerstage”

Gordon West

Prentice doesn’t play at being a woman. He plays the woman, exploring her emotions and intelligence brilliantly.

> “Much Ado Weiss Pantagraph”

Marcia Weiss

Christopher Prentice is wonderfully understated

> “AYLI, Nemtusak, Reader”

Brian Nemtusak

and she is well matched by the dashing Christopher Prentice, as bright and hilarious a couple of foolish young lovers as you could want

> “She Stoops SteadStyle”

Joe Stead
Steadstyle Chicago
  • Much Ado About Nothing
  • By William Shakespeare
  • Directed by Ronan Marra
  • With Melanie Keller, Christopher Prentice, Joseph Stearns, Vincent L. Lonergan, Meredith Bell, Aaron Snook, Brandon Bruce, Charles Schoenherr
  • Signal Ensemble Theatre
  • 2003

Love is in the air! And that means warring wits, waggling tongues, big laughs and flowing tears.

Don Pedro and his men return from war looking for a little fun in the sun, and everyone’s involved: the younger ones fall instantly in love and the older ones try desperately to stay out of it. All the passion, all the intrigue, all the deception, trickery, and most of all: romance!

Cast

Meredith Bell
Hero
Brandon Bruce
Dogberry
Melanie Keller
Beatrice
Vincent L. Lonergan
Leonato
Christopher Prentice
Benedick
Aaron Snook
Claudio
Joseph Stearns
Don Pedro
Tiffany Carter
Margaret
Christopher Clementson
Conrade
Jennifer Faletto
Hugh Oatcake
Len Hoover
Francis Seacole
Ronald Kuzava
Verges
Dave Lykins
Antonio
Erin Myers
Ursula
Eric Paskey
Balthasar
Michael E. Smith
Borachio
Bob Wilson
Friar Francis/Sexton
Shawn Yardley
Ursula

Creative

Ronan Marra
Director
Nancy Freeman
Scenic Design
Laura M. Dana
Costume Design
Whitney Buchman
Lighting Design
Jeremy Dobbins
Sound Designer/Production Stage Manager
Joseph Stearns
Original Music
Dorrie Ferguson
Choreographer
Lara Maerz
Props
Anthony Ingram
Stage Manager

Aaron Snook brings some desperately needed charm to the hotheaded Claudio, Joseph Stearns and Christopher Prentice back him up with wit and poise, and Melanie Keller’s excellent Beatrice evokes Rosalind Russell. As usual, though, the clowns—Brandon Bruce and Ronald Kuzava—steal the show.